Chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again. Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again (eBook, 2008) [www.dinstinct.com] 2019-03-17

Chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again Rating: 8,7/10 1276 reviews

Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's...

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

I am actually shocked this got published. Most of the book is a romp through popular culture: the Stanley Kubrick film and Adrian Lyne's remake—the release unfortunately coincided with the murder of JonBenet Ramsey—as well as dismal stage adaptations; Brooke Shields's roles and ads and Japanese gothic Lolita fashion. I tried reading it years ago and stopped over halfway through. On the other hand, there is a temptation for both Lolita and reader to empathise with Humbert in a perverse version of Stockholm Syndrome. It couldn't have been for many reasons, not the least of which is that the Eisenhower America to which it was to be shown, wouldn't tolerate a real Lolita. The Kubrick and Lyne movies and their stars, screenwriters, cinematographers, and even extras. Ultimately, the whole form and content of the story conspires against the person, the child that is Lolita.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

It's also his effort to try and divorce Delores Haze from this mass rhetoric which had steadily left her suffering either absent to ignored. This sleek and knowing book takes an activist approach rather than a voyeuristic one to search out, first, the sources of Nabokov's once-censored novel, and then its impact and all the misunderstandings surrounding his celebrated character. It's the perfect book to read after Lolita itself. In the summer of 1958, a 12-year-old girl took the world by storm—Lolita was published in the United States—and since then, her name has been taken in vain to serve a wide range of dubious ventures, both artistic and commercial. Instead, I found it to be a second-rate, almost pseudo-intellectual enterprise. Being charitable, we will overlook that.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again (Book, 2008) [www.dinstinct.com]

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

Vicker starts out summarizing the book, proving that he had no understanding of it whatsoever and took everything the unreliable narrator said at face value. I think society has to make a genuine scientific attempt to understand the motivation of Humbert, if not paedophiles generally, as an objective sexual aesthetic that just happens to be taboo in our society in this age. How could this have happened? Blood sisters: some responses to Lolita. Had it been otherwise we would not be discussing her today. Vickers recalls the real life cases of Elizabeth Smart, Sally Horner, Jon Benet Ramsey, Amy Fisher, and others.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again (eBook, 2008) [www.dinstinct.com]

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

That just avoids the real issue. Take one: how did they ever make a film of Lolita?. And yet, as Vickers's book demonstrates, there are also far too many readers who have been seduced by Humbert and thus have turned Lolita into a sex symbol she was never supposed to be. Fact : she was 12 and at a summer camp she did, indeed, have sex with a boy. In America she is the Lolita seen in the famous photo of Sue Lyon who starred in Stanley Kubrick's 1962 film behind heart-shaped sunglasses licking a lollipop. Yet Lolita's image in the broader public consciousness has changed.

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Chasing Lolita: How Popular Culture Corrupted Nabokov's Little Girl All Over Again eBook: Graham Vickers: www.dinstinct.com: Kindle Store

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

Vickers appears to have done some sort of uber-Google search on the word Lolita. Then we contemplate Lolita as Road Film, musing that Kerouac was typing at the same time as Nabokov was writing, from a different part of the literary universe, although Dean Moriarty considers the age of consent to be strictly for squares. Bookseller: , Washington, United States. Which leads us to the main criticism of Kubrick's film: it wasn't as true to the book as it could have been. As a result, we are condemned to perpetuate ignorance and guilt and lack of personal, social and sexual fulfillment. First of all, the title is incredibly misleading, as the book doesn't ever address what it promises.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's little girl all over again

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

Lolita in movieland 1: little victims and little princesses. I was completely fascinated by the way he describes how the image and concept of Lolita have changed based on cultural contexts and twisted to fit the needs of artists or histrionic media outlets. Conclusion : not a slut. And why providing excruciatingly detailed the synopses of every movie in a director's repertoire— or the life stories of said famous people— or the authors critical analysis of all of their works— adds any insight to the topic: I don't know. A lot of people have done this, despite Nabokov himself saying his work is meant to be reread, and that's fine. Something's that's always bothered me about the discussions which surround the book the sexual treatment of Dolores Haze, Lolita's real name, is that there appears to be some kind of strange combination of victim blaming mixed with a fetishization of the figure of the little girl.

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9781556526824

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

In the summer of 1958, a 12-year-old girl took the world by storm— Lolita was published in the United States—and since then, her name has been taken in vain to serve a wide range of dubious ventures, both artistic and commercial. I was therefore very happy to see that Graham Vickers sees it as Job Number One to squash that lie. In short, Lolita or various approximations or misapprehensions of her have become a staple of the popular culture. It establishes who Lolita really was back in 1958, explores her predecessors of all stripes, and examines the multitude of movies, theatrical shows, literary spinoffs, artifacts, fashion, art, photography, and tabloid excesses that have distorted her identity and stolen her name. These are the sorts of question I was hoping Vickers would at least ask. And an Edward Albee play which was hated by all. Songs and singers from Frank Sinatra to Waylon Jennings.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's...

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

Something's that's always bothered me about the discussions which surround the book the sexual treatment of Dolores Haze, Lolita's real name, is that there appears to be some kind of strange combination of victim blaming mixed with a fetishization of I won't argue that I've been obsessed with the novel Lolita as of late, then again I did go to the trouble to write up four essays about the novel as well as the film, and this book is just a continuation of my intellectual exploration of the novel. However, his faulting of the work of Shelly Winters as Charlotte Haze mystifies me since I think Winters was absolutely brilliant. It is too glib to treat Humbert as disingenuous and an unreliable narrator. This is required reading for anyone interested in Nabakov's beautiful novel. For those who have never read the novel, the last interpretation seems to be the one that prevails. Offering a full consideration of not only the Lolita effect but shifting attitudes toward the mix of sex, children, and popular entertainment from Victorian times to the present.

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Chasing Lolita: How Popular Culture Corrupted Nabokov's Little Girl All Over Again eBook: Graham Vickers: www.dinstinct.com: Kindle Store

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

To write about something, does not imply endorsement of the moral stance, nor does it imply that the author has some first-hand experience i. The E-mail message field is required. This child, so fresh and alive, yet so pitiable in her abuse at the hands of the novel's narrator, engendered outrage and sympathy alike, and has continued to do so ever since. Being charitable, we will overlook that. Monroe had the 1950s version of the damaged little Victorian girl syndrome and projected it with an impersonation of mental vacuity, physical vulnerability and a constant need for a father figure to look after her. Vicker's book is a response to this impulse, as well as the impulse to eroticize and fetishize Dolores Haze into some kind of sex symbol.

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Chasing Lolita : how popular culture corrupted Nabokov's...

chasing lolita how popular culture corrupted nabokovs little girl all over again

Humbert describes his love of Lolita in terms of aesthetics, as well as an attempt to relive his unconsummated early childhood relationship with Annabel Leigh. Disappointing, to say the least. Offering a full consideration of not only “the Lolita effect but shifting attitudes toward the mix of sex, children, and popular entertainment from Victorian times to the present, this study explores the movies, theatrical shows, literary spin-offs, artifacts, fashion, art, photography, and tabloid excesses that have distorted Lolita's identity with an eye toward some real-life cases of young girls who became the innocent victims of someone else's obsession—unhappy sisters to one of the most affecting heroines in fiction. Take two: once more, with feeling. Tabloids and factoids: the press and Lolita. There have also been some literary take-offs on Lolita.

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