Exodus a memoir. Exodus: A Memoir by Deborah Feldman 2019-02-18

Exodus a memoir Rating: 6,8/10 1710 reviews

Exodus: A Memoir by Deborah Feldman

exodus a memoir

She is also obnoxiously self-absorbed - more so than most memoirists, and that's saying something. Think about Pat Conroy who can write about crabs the eating kind for three pages. Feldman discovers a lot on her European journey, unfortunately one thing she finds is that there is still a lot of anti-Semitism there. I only made it 20 pages into this one. A memoir is just that, a memory. Then they get a book deal for another one and just don't have much to say or haven't figured out how to say it yet. This book is a huge disappointment.

Next

Exodus: A Memoir by Deborah Feldman (Blue Rider Press, $31)

exodus a memoir

An interesting journey with a woman trying hard to find herself and her place in this world. By the time we get to her sexual fetishism of Germans in her personal Nazi-Jewish role-playing, the book is already running on fumes. The book felt self-gratifying, like an obnoxious exercise in impression management. Was there just one trip to Europe that felt to me like four or five? The overall effect is captivating, entertaining and informative, providing readers with an honest assessment of the strength of one's convictions and the effect a strict religious background can have on a person. I just skipped through the fun parts, of Feldman with her various love interests. Nothing horrific, but let's just say I think she should know better than to just repeat whatever random Hungarians tell her about gypsies.

Next

Exodus : A Memoir

exodus a memoir

This proves my long standing belief that the more parents force their way of life on their children and repress their ability to express themselves, the more violently they will rebel and reject their teachings. Not a bad read, but again, not quite what I expected, and a little too disjointed for more than a 3 star rating. Journaling her self-awareness and eventual acceptance of herself wo Assuming that each of us has a story to tell, it is important to note that there is usually only one story. Although she has come to terms with the amount of criticisms and personal attacks she has endured with the publication of both books, Feldman has also accepted the fact that she will always be a controversial and polemic figure as a result of the popularity of her memoirs. I wanted to find out how her life evolved after leaving her Jewish community. There are many satisfying finds and revelations along the road, but there are also plenty of bumps, frustrations, disappointments and pitfalls, which is expected when one spends their formative years being closed off from the rest of the outside world, and is confined to the boundaries of a Brooklyn neighborhood. An interesting journey with a woman trying hard to find herself and her place in this world.

Next

Exodus: A Memoir by Deborah Feldman (Blue Rider Press, $31)

exodus a memoir

That sentence about sums up the experience of reading this book. When recounting the Exodus of the Children of Israel from Egypt, the Bible recounts not one, but rather a series of 42 journeys. In some ways it reminded me of Wild confession, I've seen the movie and am waiting to read the book shortly. She complains that she is forever tied to her ex husband, who may well complain that he is forever tied to his ex wife, if he were to write his memoir. Thankfully I was raised in a healthy home where I was shown the right way but allowed to make my own mistakes and question things and be understood, and that allowed me to accept and appreciate my religion. Did I really just read that?! Then it kind of jumped up to hyperspeed, got vague and just kind of ended.

Next

Exodus : A Memoir by Deborah Feldman (2015, Brand New Hardback) 9780142181850

exodus a memoir

It seems like she's trying to live life very quickly and fully, but she does come from unique circumstances. It is just a collage of experiences Feldman had in the year following the sale of her book, as she travelled the world and went to a hypnotist and dated and shopped, etc. Culminating in an unforgettable trip across Europe to retrace her grandmother s life during the Holocaust, Exodus is a deeply moving exploration of the mysterious bonds that tie us to family and religion, the bonds we must sometimes break to find our true selves. But I also spent a huge amount of time listening to her and feeling annoyed. I'm not sure how much to blame on her Hasidic upbringing and how much to blame on her innate personality, but either way: by the end of this book I was ready for a break from this author. I guess this is always going to happen and Feldman is, of course, free to leave parts of her life private, but it's still frustrating! I am aware that Deborah Feldman's actions and books are very controversial, and people claim that she has lied and left out important details. So - who am I to say it is real or not.

Next

Exodus: A Memoir by Deborah Feldman

exodus a memoir

As well, she plans to visit India, in which she is seeking material for another book she is about to write about globalization and trying to understand the evolution of ethnic identity. I later learned from mutual acquaintances that something like that had in fact happened; Feldman had workshopped the first part of the book in college. Put in her position, I can't say I would be able to do so, and therefore I don't feel that I am allowed to judge her for her actions. You sense the pendulum swinging in her life and you wonder where it will stop--or even if it will. There are ways to rebel against one's community without handling it the way she did. Feldman definitely tries to open up more. I found it to be a more contemporary publication then her first book.

Next

Exodus : a memoir (eBook, 2014) [www.dinstinct.com]

exodus a memoir

How do they handle the identity crisis that is bound to result from their decisions? Feldman juxtaposes painfully emotional moments in concentration camps and in European towns where evidence of Jewish settlers was practically erased with humorous, almost macabre playacting scenarios with a German lover, scenarios that only added to Feldman''s confusion over her own identity. She moved to New England. Feldman believes that the story she tells in Exodus is more of a wandering adventure of a person trying to discover who she really is, and got the opportunity to know herself better. And above all, why did she think anyone would be interested in reading her narcissistic adolescent whining? It took some convincing, but I eventually agreed. In 2009, at the age of twenty-three, Deborah Feldman packed up her young son and their few possessions and walked away from her insular Hasidic roots. Manche Bücher sind so ergreifend, das es mir schwerfiel die passenden Worte zu finden. Sometimes she looks for other Jews, other times she scrabbles to find some remnant of her family's history or names carved into cobblestones.

Next

Exodus : A Memoir by Deborah Feldman (2015, Brand New Hardback) 9780142181850

exodus a memoir

Incredibly though she also falls in love with a German man who's grandparents were Nazis! Despite how fascinated I am with her sto Hm. And I look forward to her next book. Since leaving, Feldman has navigated remarkable experiences- raising her son in the 'real' world, finding solace and solitude in a writing career, and searching for love. Unfortunately, unlike her first book, this one was a disappointment. In fact, towards the end, I began to skip over parts and sigh and roll my eyes.

Next

EXODUS by Deborah Feldman

exodus a memoir

She wants to leave her insular religious community, but she can't reject--nor does she want to reject--her Jewishness. Deborah's journey from her Hasidic roots through a variety of relationships and encounters, both with people from dramatically different realities; as wel I just received a copy if this book through the FirstReads giveaway. I didn't find Exodus quite as interesting as I remember Feldman's first memoir, Unorthodox. In order to work through a l I loved Deborah Feldman's first memoir Unorthodox, where she described growing up in the Hasidic Jewish community and making the decision to leave. Her life story is a work in progress as she continues to navigate into her newly found world. She was determined to forge a better life for herself, away from the rampant oppression, abuse, and isolation of her Satmar upbringing in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Still, it's beautifully written and an engrossing read.

Next